Tag Archives: conversion

Computer printed ASCII-portraits by Jaume Estapa, 1968-69. Some of the earliest examples of this, after Mona Lisa (1964). More info here, more 1960′s ASCII here.

In the 1960s, Eduardo Joselevich and Fanny Fingerman developed a technique to represent images with only four symbols. Full blocks or circles, in either black or white. They called it Fototrama and it was used at Olivetti and Philips for example.

More here.

Text graphics by Manfred Schroeder at Bell Labs in 1968. For the cover of the exhibition catalogue for Some More Beginnings organised by Experiments in Art and Technology (E.A.T.) at the Brooklyn Museum. h/t: Tim Koch

prostheticknowledge:

Mona By The Numbers

Probably the earliest example of computer-generated text art, put together in 1964 by H. Philip Peterson:
In 1964, H. Philip Peterson of Control Data Corporation (CDC) used a CDC 3200 computer and a “flying-spot” scanner to create a digital representation of the Mona Lisa. The image contained 100,000 pixels that were plotted using numerals, sometimes overprinted, to approximate the required density and took 14 hours to complete.

Similar digital images of popular art, cartoon characters, and even nudes adorned the walls of corporate offices, labs, and computer centers throughout the 1960s.

You can find out more about the ‘Digital Mona Lisa’ here, and there is an online viewer for closer inspection here

Waldemar Cordeiro, one of the first computer artists in South America. Not all textmode, but it’s all about appearance, innit?

The woman who is not B.B., 1971. source

Retrato de Fabiana, 1970. source source

uma imagem (?), 1969. source